IDC ranks ZTE at the top of CDMA market share

ZTE Corp achieved the leadership position in the global market share for CDMA BTS network solutions with 30.3% share as per market research firm, IDC’s 2010 Global CDMA Market and Prospects research note.

According to the research, by Q1 2010 ZTE had recorded shipments of more than 250,000 base stations.

Li Jian, General Manager for CDMA & LTE products at ZTE, said, “The evolution from CDMA to LTE is not something which can be achieved overnight. The networks of the two systems must therefore meet high connectivity and interoperability requirements. By providing comprehensive product offerings for both CDMA and GSM networks, we help operators handle concurrent operation of two or more networks. This is why we have won recognition from all leading operators in the world.”

“ZTE’s strength in CDMA does not stop at pricing and commitment,” commented Godfrey Chua, Research Manager at IDC. “The company is increasingly known for its innovations and efforts to push the technology forward.”

This is an interesting turn of events for CDMA promoted primarily by US manufacturers like Motorola and Lucent.

CDMA operators in Indian market face wait for additional 3G spectrum

Indian CDMA-based cellcos are facing a protracted wait for any additional 3G spectrum after the country’s armed forces revealed that they would not release frequencies in the 1900MHz band in the immediate future. According to India’s Economic Times, in a recent meeting between the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) and the Defence Ministry the latter rejected demands by the regulator to vacate the spectrum it currently holds in the 1900MHz band, instead seeking exclusive rights to frequencies in that band. The DoT however said that such exclusivity could not be granted, as the 1900MHz band represented ‘the only growth path for CDMA operators and had already been allocated for auction’.

The armed forces have also reportedly refused to commit to a date for the release of 10MHz of 2G spectrum, despite having previously signed a Memorandum of Understanding last year under which it agreed to hand back 2G frequencies in phases based on the progress of the alternate communication network that BSNL and MTNL are jointly building for the forces. The DoT is seeking an immediate release of the agreed spectrum on the basis that the alternate fibre backbone is now 90% completed. Defence Ministry officials however have said that it will only review the DoT’s request after the fibre-optic network stabilises.

US CDMA operators ramping femtocell activities – New report suggests

Sprint and Verizon Wireless are apparently set to focus more attention on femtocells in the near future, with the availability of 3G products a key driver. According to reports, Sprint has just made available its first 3G device, manufactured by Airvana, while Light Reading Mobile noted a Verizon Wireless job posting which indicates the operator is looking for a product manager for its in-building offerings, with 3G femtocells deemed a “key project.” The main advantages of 3G femtocells is their ability to provide improved in-building coverage for data services, as well as voice. According to a recent survey by Dell’Oro Group, while 1 million femtocells will ship during 2011, this will grow to 62 million in 2014, with less than 20 percent of these being CDMA-family units.

It was noted that Sprint is offering its EV-DO femtocells free-of-charge to customers with reception issues in their homes, compared with many other operators worldwide which are charging for femtocells – Sprint also charges for its 2G femtocell devices. Although calls and data connections are routed through a user’s home DSL connection, Sprint will take traffic into account as part of its monthly voice and data allowance limits. Verizon is, in contrast, looking initially to target enterprise users, with femtocells having the potential to form part of a fixed-mobile convergence solution. AT&T already offers a 3G femtocell solution for its WCDMA network.

CDMA version of iPhone is coming

A potential deal between Apple and Verizon — which could result in a CDMA iPhone capable of simultaneous voice and data — is still being ironed out, according to one Wall Street analyst.

Shaw Wu with Kaufman Bros. issued a note to investors on Monday, in which he said he expects Apple to expand the iPhone to another carrier in the U.S. next year. Apple needs this, he said, to maintain high growth, as the company’s smartphone nears saturation on the AT&T network.

The current front-runner is Verizon, which is said to be in talks with Apple for a “SVDO” iPhone which would allow both voice and data at the same time, something not possible with a traditional CDMA phone on Verizon’s network.

While Wu believes that the iPhone will eventually come to Verizon, that could happen as late as 2012, he said, if Apple decided instead to go another route: both T-Mobile and Sprint.

“It is notable that signing up both T-Mobile USA and Sprint would almost be the equivalent of Verizon (in terms of subscribers),” he said. “For point of reference, AT&T has 90 million wireless subscribers compared to 93 million at Verizon, 48 million at Sprint, and 34 million at T-Mobile USA.”

Wu said sources have indicated to him that important details are still being ironed out between Verizon and Apple, including technology and economics. But while the companies are in talks, he said it would be “premature” to rule out T-Mobile and Sprint.

However, the growth of Android on the Verizon network also provides Apple with an incentive to make the iPhone available on the carrier, he said. Making the iPhone available to Verizon customers would be the best way to address the growing presence of Android phones, Wu wrote.

While Apple and Verizon are said to be eying SVDO for the iPhone for now, the companies are said to be viewing that option as an interim device until a full-fledged long-term evolution (LTE) 4G phone debuts in a few years.

“From AAPL’s perspective, the debate is whether it makes sense to roll out an interim CDMA iPhone sometime in 2011 or perhaps wait until LTE becomes more available in 2012,” Wu wrote.

Reports of a deal between Verizon and Apple are, of course, nothing new, and have persisted for years. But recently, a number of rumors have pointed toward a January 2011 launch for a CDMA iPhone available on the largest wireless network in the U.S., Verizon.

Apple has reportedly gone as far as to build early CDMA iPhones that are currently in the engineering verification test phase. That is one step below device verification test, or DVT status, which takes place right before production. The iPhone 4 handset that was found in a bar this year was a DVT handset.

Sprint, Pacific DataVision take NextMail to CDMA

Sprint Nextel announced that its NextMail offering — powered by Pacific DataVision and previously available only on iDEN devices — also is available on all Sprint CDMA devices, including the new HTC EVO 4G.

Designed primarily for enterprises, NextMail lets mobile users instantaneously send a recorded voice message to as many as 50 e-mail addresses or to 50 mobile devices, each of which can be sent with the push of a button — “Direct Connect” on a Nextel device or “Send” on a Sprint or Nextel device. The messaging system also can include confirmation of receipt notification.

Such functionality is particularly beneficial to field workers that need to maintain communications with enterprise headquarters and others in an environment that is driven increasingly by e-mail and text messaging, said John Pescatore, CEO of Pacific DataVision.

“We help improve the efficiency of the work force,” Pescatore said, noting the return-on-investment that NextMail can provide to enterprises. “If you think about being able to make one or two more calls if you are a field tech — or, as a field nurse, see one or two more patients — because you don’t have to go back to the office … it becomes very powerful.”

Long available on Nextel devices, this is the first time NextMail has been available on Sprint CDMA devices, Pescatore said. While Pacific DataVision’s business arrangement is with Sprint Nextel for its iDEN and CDMA networks, the fundamental messaging service and platform could be adapted to networks using other technologies, as well, he said.

Available immediately, NextMail is available for $7.50 per month per user and NextMail Professional — a service that includes a location stamp, photo service and status mapping tools — is $19.99 per month per user.

Motorola adds two new CDMA phones

Struggling mobile manufacture Motorola has decided populate the market of mid-range handsets through its two new handsets: Rambler and Bali. The phone will be bought to focus in U.S first and will be available by 11th Aug, 2010.

The Rambler has been bought as a clamshell device and features
QWERTY keyboard which provides a better messaging option. It also features 1.3-megapixel camera, decent web browsing option, support for video-recording, A2DP Bluetooth, GPS support and e-mail support too. The phone has been priced at $100.
On the other hand if you will take a close look of Bali, its feature are very similar to Rambler, other than that it comes in T9 version. It mainly adds 1.3-megapixel camera, Bluetooth, and microSD slot. It also comes with some external key controls. The handset has been priced at $150.

However, one thing that is most common in both the handsets, both comes in flip-version. Let’s see when this handset enters the Indian mobile market.

CTIA: AirWalk linking the enterprise PBX to the femtocell

By Kevin Fitchard 

A growing number of vendors are targeting femtocells at the enterprise with the goal of extending wide area cellular coverage to the office, but AirWalk Communications posits that the femtocell could be so much more, becoming not just an extension of the enterprise voice network, but replacing the enterprise wireless LAN entirely. 

Today AirWalk unveiled the enterprise version of its femto solution, the EdgePoint Pro, a miniature base station that can be mounted in a server rack and support up to 28 simultaneous calls. Like other enterprise femto platforms, the EdgePoint comes with mobility management functions that allow a cluster of femto cells to act as a group network rather than as individual isolated devices, but AirWalk has also added enterprise features to the device that allow the phone to act as an extension of the IP PBX. Standard PBX features such as 4-number dialing, call forwarding, waiting and directory services could be grafted onto any handset supporting a session initiation protocol (SIP) client. 

AirWalk CEO Serge Pequeux said that more and more people are using their cellphones as their primary work devices even while at the office. Instead of using the femtocell to expand the public wireless network inside the confines of the enterprise, why not bring the private enterprise network to the public one? What’s more a network of femtocells could be used to replace the corporate WLAN network entirely. AirWalk will offer both CDMA 1X and 1X EV-DO versions of the device, meaning an enterprise could deploy data femtos alongside of voice femtos. Such as set-up would create a data overlay, which an entire cell of EV-DO capacity dedicated to just a few users. Since the data-femto would form part of a private network backhauled through the enterprise’s own data connection, the operator wouldn’t have to worry about broadband capacity being siphoned off from the macro network. 

In the GSM-UMTS world, operators and vendors are exploring using unlicensed mobile access (UMA), which currently powers many residential dual-mode Wi-Fi deployments, as a means of tunneling voice traffic from enterprise femto network to the operator’s core. AirWalk and several other vendors are backing a different route, though, opting instead to bring the SIP protocols that power VoIP networks to wireless. Optimally a SIP-based femto network would seamlessly meld into an IP multimedia subsystem architecture, but as IMS is still a ways off in most operators, they would need to deploy convergence servers to connect their legacy voice networks to the SIP-based architecture at the enterprise. 

Last year, AirWalk, Tatara Systems and Tango networks collaborated to demonstrate just such a convergence solution. Tango’s supplied its Abrazo platform, which extends PBX functions to the mobile phone. AirWalk supplied its femtocell, while Tatara’s convergence server linked the network back to the operator’s network.

Verizon to Get BlackBerry 9630 Niagara Months Before Sprint?

By: Michael Kwan

Earlier this week, we got a good look at the BlackBerry Niagara 9630, the CDMA amalgamation of the GSM-sourced BlackBrry Curve 8900 and Bold 9000. At the time, we saw a leaked roadmap pointing toward a Q3 release with Sprint.

Well, if you’re a part of the Verizon crew, you may be able to beat your Sprint buddies to the punch. There is a rumor going around that the BlackBerry 9630 Niagara will hit the red checkmark some time this May. That’s only a couple of months away (and just in time for my buddy in Lake County).

This May release date comes courtesy of an anonymous source “familiar with the plan.” These analysts aren’t being particularly specific, but a May release date is well within the realm of reason, considering that the buggy beta units are already filtering their way onto YouTube.

If the GSM pricing for the Bold 9000 and Javelin 8900 are any indication, I’m going to venture a guess that Verizon will sell the BlackBerry 9630 Niagara for about $200 with a qualifying two-year contract. No word yet on when (and if) this handset will jump over to Telus and Bell in Canada, but they’re pretty likely candidates too.

CDMA operators offer 20 times faster internet connections

Rajesh S Kurup / Mumbai

Your wireless internet connection has just got faster, with CDMA operators launching services that offer speeds of up to 3.1 mbps.

On a comparative basis, this is faster by over 20 times than the existing wireless broadband connections, and 10 times than average broadband connections in the country.
At present, broadband is defined as always-on connectivity with 256 kbps speed on Ethernet connections (wired), while the maximum speed available over wireless is around 144 kbps.
However, the upload and download speeds do not match the advertised speeds, which can be misleading to users. Users in India, for instance, only get around 30-40 kbps connectivity on a 256 kbps connection and a meagre 9-10 kbps on a 144 kbps connection during peak times, according to Internet Service Providers Association of India (ISPAI) President Rajesh Chharia.
Tata Teleservices has launched ‘Photon+’, a plug and play device that offers data speeds of up to 3.1 mbps. It claims that this is 20 times faster than existing wireless mobile technologies. It has also unveiled another product — Power Launcher — an Ethernet-based broadband product that offers speeds up to 100 mbps.
“There is an explosion of internet usage in the country, with an increase in usage of bandwidth …the number of individual internet users far exceeded that of corporate users, and the launch of these services will enable faster and trouble-free internet access,” Tata Teleservices (Maharashtra) Ltd Managing Director Mukund Govind Rajan said.
According to the recent Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (Trai) data, the total number of internet connections in the country stand at around 13 million, of which broadband connections are 5.65 million.
Another CDMA player, Reliance Communications has also rolled out a high-speed broadband service, Reliance Netconnect Broadband Plus. This has a downlink speed of up to 3.1 mbps and a separate uplink speed of up to 1.8 mbps, which the company claims is much higher than any other offering in the country.
“This is the inflection point for the Indian internet industry and would enable broadband access to millions of online Indians,” RCom President Mahesh Prasad said, attributing the poor penetration to the limitations of wireline internet like last mile connectivity and time taken for network deployment.
But are these tall claims? According to Chharia: “Their claims are right as 3.1 Mbps connections can be offered. However, will these companies provide both access and international bandwidth at these speeds? If both access and bandwidth are provided at these speeds, it’s a great leap for the industry”.
The Cellular Operators’ Association of India (COAI) is not amused. The body of GSM operators has sought the Department of Telecommunications’ (DoT) intervention to stop these services, which it claims are 3G EVDO services. It is “legally untenable” to permit select players to get a preferential headstart to offer 3G services, it wrote in a letter to the DoT.
“Controversies are a part of this industry. However, in the end the services are beneficial to the customers,” said Mukund Govind Rajan.

CDMA operators offer 20 times faster internet connections

Rajesh S Kurup / Mumbai  

Your wireless internet connection has just got faster, with CDMA operators launching services that offer speeds of up to 3.1 mbps.

 

On a comparative basis, this is faster by over 20 times than the existing wireless broadband connections, and 10 times than average broadband connections in the country.

At present, broadband is defined as always-on connectivity with 256 kbps speed on Ethernet connections (wired), while the maximum speed available over wireless is around 144 kbps.

However, the upload and download speeds do not match the advertised speeds, which can be misleading to users. Users in India, for instance, only get around 30-40 kbps connectivity on a 256 kbps connection and a meagre 9-10 kbps on a 144 kbps connection during peak times, according to Internet Service Providers Association of India (ISPAI) President Rajesh Chharia.

Tata Teleservices has launched ‘Photon+’, a plug and play device that offers data speeds of up to 3.1 mbps. It claims that this is 20 times faster than existing wireless mobile technologies. It has also unveiled another product — Power Launcher — an Ethernet-based broadband product that offers speeds up to 100 mbps.
“There is an explosion of internet usage in the country, with an increase in usage of bandwidth …the number of individual internet users far exceeded that of corporate users, and the launch of these services will enable faster and trouble-free internet access,” Tata Teleservices (Maharashtra) Ltd Managing Director Mukund Govind Rajan said.

According to the recent Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (Trai) data, the total number of internet connections in the country stand at around 13 million, of which broadband connections are 5.65 million.

Another CDMA player, Reliance Communications has also rolled out a high-speed broadband service, Reliance Netconnect Broadband Plus. This has a downlink speed of up to 3.1 mbps and a separate uplink speed of up to 1.8 mbps, which the company claims is much higher than any other offering in the country.

“This is the inflection point for the Indian internet industry and would enable broadband access to millions of online Indians,” RCom President Mahesh Prasad said, attributing the poor penetration to the limitations of wireline internet like last mile connectivity and time taken for network deployment.

But are these tall claims? According to Chharia: “Their claims are right as 3.1 Mbps connections can be offered. However, will these companies provide both access and international bandwidth at these speeds? If both access and bandwidth are provided at these speeds, it’s a great leap for the industry”.

The Cellular Operators’ Association of India (COAI) is not amused. The body of GSM operators has sought the Department of Telecommunications’ (DoT) intervention to stop these services, which it claims are 3G EVDO services. It is “legally untenable” to permit select players to get a preferential headstart to offer 3G services, it wrote in a letter to the DoT.

“Controversies are a part of this industry. However, in the end the services are beneficial to the customers,” said Mukund Govind Rajan.